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Friday, May 22, 2020 | History

3 edition of philosophy of punishment found in the catalog.

philosophy of punishment

H. B. Acton

philosophy of punishment

a collection of papers

by H. B. Acton

  • 354 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by St. Martin"s Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Punishment

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by H. B. Acton.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination238 p. ;
    Number of Pages238
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13524435M
    OCLC/WorldCa2028675

    Thomas Aquinas and the Philosophy of Punishment explores how Aquinas's understandings of natural law and the common good apply to the contemporary philosophical discussion of punitive awordathought.com by: 1. General Overviews. There are several excellent general overviews on the philosophy of punishment. Perhaps the best general overview on punishment is Bedau , while the best on legal punishment would be Duff Murtagh also offers a useful general overview of punishment. Foucault offers a revealing account of the history and sociology of punishment.

    Nov 07,  · According to the book, Criminal Law and Punishment, written by Joel Samaha, the characteristics of punishment include pain or unpleasant consequences, punishment prescribed by the law, punishment administered intentionally and punishment administered by the state (Samaha 22). Feb 01,  · Few authors have been as personally familiar with desperation as Fyodor Dostoevsky (), and none have been so adept at describing it. His harrowing experiences in Russian prisons, combined with a profound religious philosophy, formed the basis for his greatest books: Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, The Possessed, and The Brothers Karamazov/5.

    Note: Citations are based on reference standards. However, formatting rules can vary widely between applications and fields of interest or study. The specific requirements or preferences of your reviewing publisher, classroom teacher, institution or organization should be applied. Punishment can be explained by positive prevention theory to use the criminal justice system to teach people what are the social norms for what is correct, and acts as a reinforcement. Punishment can serve as a means for society to publicly express denunciation of an action as being criminal.


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Philosophy of punishment by H. B. Acton Download PDF EPUB FB2

This unique introduction to the philosophy of punishment provides a systematic analysis of the themes of retribution, deterrence, rehabilitation, incapacitation and restorative justice.

Integrating philosophical, philosophy of punishment book, political and ethical perspectives, it provides a Cited by: 1. This edition updates the most successful anthology on punishment.

It includes leading articles representing major positions on the philosophy of punishment PUNISHMENT AND REHABILITATION (Philosophy): Jeffrie G. Murphy: awordathought.com: BooksAuthor: Jeffrie G.

Murphy. Dec 30,  · Peter Karl Koritansky, Assistant Professor of History, Philosophy, and Religious Studies at the University of Prince Edward Island, is the author of Thomas Aquinas and the Philosophy of Punishment.

He lives in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, awordathought.com: Hardcover. Dec 05,  · Thomas Aquinas and the Philosophy of Punishment explores how Aquinas's understandings of natural law and the common good apply to the contemporary philosophical discussion of punitive justice.

It is the first book-length study to consider this question in decades, and the only book that confronts modern views of the awordathought.com by: 1.

humans. Therefore, the idea of punishment may be considered as older than the human existence and consecrated in religious teachings and holly books and applied by peoples of different stages of human evolution, and even to this day.

The current paper highlights the history of penal development, and the origin and philosophy of punishment. PHILOSOPHIES OF PUNISHMENT Punishment serves numerous social-control functions, but it is usually jus-tified on the principles of retribution, incapacitation, deterrence, rehabilita-tion, and/or restoration.

The specific principles that underlie these dominant philosophies for punishment are summarized below. RETRIBUTION.

PHILOSOPHY OF PUNISHMENT It is found, then, that the earlier theories of punishment for crime involved the motives of vengeance, retaliation, retribution or compen-sation-at first "in kind" or at a fixed scale-and of deterrence against repetition by the criminal or imitation by others.

Cited by: 1. Punishment may also involve various types of informal sanctions by family, peers, and extralegal groups like vigilante committees and paramil- itary organizations to promote their own interests. Philosophy can, of course, help supply certain desiderata of the theory, such as specification of the quality and quantity of deprivations (the modes of punishment) appropriate to include in the penalty schedule; construction of the schedule coordinate with the class of crimes; identification of subordinate norms to supplement those already mentioned, which serve as constraints on the schedule and the.

May 15,  · Crime and Punishment is a novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky, one of the founders of the modern novel. Crime and Punishment tells the story of redemption. This novel deals with the question of responsibility for the actions of each individual, background of struggle between God, morality and the theory of the Superman.

The most fundamental and enduring criticism of the utilitarian theory of punishment (hereafter, the UTP) is the claim that utilitarianism necessitates a disjunction between punishment and justice.¹ The basis for this criticism is the fact that utilitarians insist that the moral and political justification of punishment is exclusively derived from the beneficial consequences that punishment can promote, such as.

Philosophies of Punishment. This book is titled Restoring Justice because it indicates the strong need for reconciliation in Colombia, which was (and to a lesser extent, still is) so. awordathought.com: philosophy of punishment. Skip to main content. Try Prime All Go Search EN Hello, Sign in Account & Lists Sign in Account & Lists Orders Try Prime Cart.

Today's Deals. This book offers a philosophical analysis of the moral and legal justifications for the use of force. While the book focuses on the ethics self-defense, it also explores its relation to lesser evil justifications, public authority, the justification of punishment, and the ethics of war.

Punishment is a critical introduction to the philosophy of punishment, offering a new and refreshing approach that will benefit readers of all backgrounds and interests.

The first critical guide to examine all leading contemporary theories of punishment, this book explores – among others – the communicative theory of punishment, restorative. The moral philosophy at work in Crime and Punishment uses emotion and intuition to explain several principles and key points in philosophy.

For example, Raskolnikov’s behavior reflects how Kant was a strong supporter of a political entity that was informed by. Sep 20,  · Book review: Why Punish.

An Introduction to the Philosophy of Punishment. Steve Collett. Probation Journal 3 An Introduction to the Philosophy of Punishment Show all authors.

Steve Collett. Steve Collett. Honorary Fellow, University of Liverpool, and Honorary Reader, University of Manchester Probation and the philosophy of Author: Steve Collett. Thomas Aquinas and the Philosophy of Punishment explores how Aquinas's understandings of natural law and the common good apply to the contemporary philosophical discussion of punitive justice.

It is the first book-length study to consider this question in decades, and the only book that confronts modern views of the topic. Jun 12,  · Anthony Ellis was Senior Lecturer in Moral Philosophy, and Chair of the Moral Philosophy Department in the University of St.

Andrews, Scotland, before becoming Professor of Philosophy in Virginia Commonwealth University. He was also co-founder and first Academic Director of the Centre for Philosophy and Public Affairs in St.

awordathought.com: Anthony Ellis. Retribution is the best philosophy of punishment, more so than the other philosophies of punishment such as deterrence, incapacitation, rehabilitation, and restitution.

The purpose of punishment is to prevent wrongdoing and to punish wrongdoers. Retribution best exemplifies punishment. Nov 14,  · Punishment is a critical introduction to the philosophy of punishment, offering a new and refreshing approach that will benefit readers of all backgrounds and interests.

The first critical guide to examine all leading contemporary theories of punishment, this book explores – among others – the communicative theory of punishment, restorative.Book Summary Raskolnikov, an impoverished student, conceives of himself as being an extraordinary young man and then formulates a theory whereby the extraordinary men of the world have a right to commit any crime if they have something of worth to offer humanity.After briefly noting problems surrounding the very definition of punishment, we will examine the traditionally most prominent methods of justifying the practice of punishment: consequentialist or utilitarian theories and retributive theories.